SHARE

Coming back from an extended period of travel or living as an expat is more difficult than going away. You’ve changed so much from the new culture, ways of life, and influence from your new friends, that it will make you feel out of place when coming back home. Currently, I experience travel depression where my excitement of catching up with the people that know from little does not match my expectation. I realized life in my hometown does not change. First of all, I’m very grateful for coming back with a new perspective.  Many times when I’m on the road I missed them. And I wish I’m not stressfully living in foreign place.  However, when I shared (with happiness) of my adventure, they brush it off. Or immediately change the topic. I feel hurt and confuse. After reading experiences from other bloggers or travelers, now I understand. This post-travel depression many shared after being back home is one of the hardest parts.  So, began my search of how to cope with this feeling. Here I are several tips and tricks to adjust to a (new) life back home.

Photo by: MG Young Photography

See the positives in being back

“Remember that travelling wasn’t always a laugh a minute. What about the time your bag got nicked along with your passport and bank cards? How does your bedroom compare with that dorm in the hostel from hell?” – Rough Guides

Be prepared for negativity

For the period that you have been travelling, you will have been around people who are positive about life, and that rubs off on you. On returning home, be prepared to be offloaded on; family and friends wanted to share everything negative that had gone on in their life while you were away. All this negativity just added to my post travel depression.” – Explorelist

Find support

You’ve been to places some people only dream of….And now you are finding it tough being back in the reality your friends have been living whilst you were away?  You may find sympathy short lived and empathy missing”?..So, DO reach out to other people who are experiencing the same feelings as you or better still, have survived the experience.” – Destination Unknown

Get back into a regular exercise routine

“Eat healthy foods, and get the rest that your body needs, especially when dealing with jet lag. If possible, don’t rush back into work. Instead, slowly ease in and maybe take a day or two off prior to returning to work.” – Sidetracked Travel Blog

Embrace your own backyard

Being back home doesn’t have to mean settling into the same old routine. Have a look around: there might be a secret wilderness you’ve never unearthed, a prime landmark you’ve never properly visited, a wealth of fascinating local history you can delve into. You can have a great travel experience on your doorstep.” – Wanderlust Travel Magazine

Plan your next adventure

This is not the end of your holiday or adventure. Think of this as more of a pitstop, a chance to replenish your travel fund and  to recover from that trip. Most importantly, this is the time to plan for your next holiday or your once-in-a-lifetime adventure.” – We Are Sole Sisters

Top up your escape fund

One thing is certain once you get back from your trip – your reserve account to fund your travels is now back to ZERO….Be creative and think outside the box. Before you know it, you’ll have enough money to be on the road once again.” – We Are Sole Sisters

Setting realistic expectations

One way to avoid getting the blues after you return home is not to have overinflated expectations of what you’re going to do — and more importantly, who you’re going to do it with — after you get back…For me, the best policy is trying only to anticipate the givens: Your own bed; your own car, bike or other form of transport; familiar surroundings; and the language you’re used to speaking. Focus your energy on being thankful for the most fundamentally satisfying aspects of being at home — let the rest happen as organically as possible.” – Leave Your Daily Hell

Volunteer, network, and connect

“Something we all suffer from when returning home is not being able to express how we feel and what we’ve experienced with old friends and family who haven’t had the same — or at least similar — experiences we have….To help bridge that gap, I started hanging out with travelers in my city who could understand me and the things that I was feeling. I did this not to replace my old friends, but to help myself transition.” – She’s Wanderful

Be vigilant about thoughts that give rise to negative emotions, even it may seem very natural

“Do not destroy preciousness of your travel experience by longing for it after you come back by making a mental delusion of conceptualizing it into a “thing” to crave for and wishing to “possess” or “keep” it. Merge with the flow of reality of change by bringing your awareness to the present moment. Joyfully!” – Travel Soul Therapy

 

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here